Tag: politics

#madwd Making a difference with data: Cllr Darren Johnson

Darren Johnson – London Assembly Member and Lewisham Cllr – green Party

Notes on his comments at Making a Difference with Data.

  • data is essential as part of our scrutiny role.
  • we find getting hold of data takes up a good chunk of our time – and our support staff.
  • generally we have problems – officials often reluctant to release raw data to members and meners of the public
  • I’ve started to request that all data I ask for goes on the London datastore so it’s shared [great thing to do]
  • changing the way we make policy – all data we use to make policy is getting shared, which speeds up the analysis of the policy by scrutiny easier.
  • Sharing tree information across London changed tree planting approach – but three years ago it is still like pulling teeth to release the data again.
  • need open and complete information on publicly owned land.
  • on average it costs ¬£300 to answer and Assembly members question. ¬†With open data fewer questions will be asked and so less admin needs to happen – he hopes.

Stuff I've seen February 20th through to February 23rd

These are my links for February 20th through February 23rd:

  • Socitm and LGA prepare open data guidance | Kable – The Society for IT Management and the Local Government Association are preparing advice to help councils make more of their data publicly available
  • Pulling down and building up: Citizen Ethics Network « Nick Baines’s Blog – "When I read it I felt genuine hope for the first time in a long time that it might be possible to change the way we talk about ethics, public policy and those who engage in the public discourse."
  • Citizen Ethics Network – There is a widespread concern that the winner takes all mentality of the
    banker, and the corrupted values of the politician, have replaced a common
    sense ethics of fairness and integrity. Many worry that an emphasis on a
    shallow individualism has damaged personal relationships and weakened
    important social bonds."
  • Iceland mulling plan to become ‘haven’ for journalism – The China Post – "Hoping to make Iceland a global home for freedom of speech, lawmakers are asking the government this week to implement a journalist's dream package of legislation — promising a safe haven for reporters who want to dig deep, hit hard, and avoid being sued. "
  • MASHe » Blog Archive » Twitter powered subtitles for BBC iPlayer – "Whilst in the general populous there is still uncertainty over the benefits of sites like twitter broadcasters are already exploring how this technology can be used. A case in point in the BBC/Open University The Virtual Revolution series which is exploring how 20 years of the web has shaped our lives. Its not surprising that a programme of this ilk is exploring how technology can be used to support the broadcast (including allowing viewers to mash-up and reuse clips from the series), it is also the first programme that I’ve seen broadcast a hashtag within its opening credits. The hashtag is a community driven invention which allows comments and content to be tracked across the web including in comments made as tweets."

Stuff I've seen January 12th through to January 14th

These are my links for January 12th through January 14th:

  • John Popham’s Random Musings – "I have been quite annoyed by some of the accounts of “heroic” struggles to get to work through the snow, because, it seemed to me, that some of them just weren’t necessary." John on why the web doesn't seem to make it easier for people to work without traveling through snow.
  • Building the “reusable video” player « Carl’s Notepad – "What i’d like is a player which has the ability to pull content from any source, youtube or vimeo or a traditional video storage platform – I’d also like to add value by providing a feature that allowed me to layer content, questions etc over the top to gain additional benefit from the original content. I’d like to be in a position to reuse our existing video archives and repurpose them, or use other public material from either central government or other local authorities providing the content was reusable”"
  • Official Google Blog: A new approach to China – "we have discovered that the accounts of dozens of U.S.-, China- and Europe-based Gmail users who are advocates of human rights in China appear to have been routinely accessed by third parties."
  • Google to end censorship in China | Technology | guardian.co.uk – "Google acknowledged that the decision might well mean Google.cn, and potentially the company's offices in China, would have to close."
  • Management | Zoetica: Connecting Organizations with Their Networks – Beth Kanter becomes a Chief exec.

Stuff I've seen September 19th through to September 20th

These are my links for September 19th through September 20th:

  • BBC NEWS | Politics | Dyke in BBC ‘conspiracy’ claim – Greg Dyke was impatient for change when he was at the BBC – remember if you have a radical boss find a way to support them: "Our current model was designed for the 18th Century. It doesn't fit 21st Century Britain," he told the meeting. And he added: "We want more influence over our lives and we are not just prepared to hand it over to this strange bunch of people who stand for Parliament because they have been knocking on people's doors for 10 years." "
  • Online Database of Social Media Policies – This database contains 82 documents.
  • Sentiment analysis – analysis « Emma Mulqueeny – Emma: "it is the first step I have seen in digitally automating the mood of the nation on any given topic."
  • Sarah Lay on Twitter and Coseley Baths – Sarah was almost in tears: "This account is the voice of a swimming baths in the Black Country on which the local council has taken the decision to condemn it to closure and demolition."
  • Sarkozy’s blue-chip Commission recommends measuring social capital « Social Capital Blog – It's personal" "A formal organization with a name and address may not correspond to any actual individual members, much less to social networks among those members. Moreover, the role of associations differs from country to country. Because of these reasons, measures of organizational density are generally not good measures of social connections, despite their frequent use for that purpose."